Tuesday, May 26, 2020

College Student Vs. Peers - 1921 Words

The life of a college student is one that holds many simplicities and complexities. But in the case of â€Å"College Student vs. Peers†, college students hold many obvious and hidden privileges over their peers who choose not to go to college. These privileges range from gaining perks of future financial stability to growth of their present emotional maturity. Of course, the most obvious advantages involve the idea that college will provide you with a better life. And by a better life I mean the works. You will be introduced to better job opportunities, chances to work in the field of your choice, higher income, expanded knowledge, better social skills, independence, a chance to conquer developmental milestones and investments into your future. According to â€Å"The Atlantic.Com†, a survey showed that many people believe that college degrees are inherited. Therefore, if you obtain a college degree then your children are more likely to do the same and your children†™s children will also follow, creating a cycle of educated individuals instead of high school drop outs. The average age of entering college or the work force is 18. At 18, not many have their lives figured out to the tee on exactly what they want to do and how they will get it done. For some they have gotten to this stage, but life threw them a curve ball in which they may have to take another route. Being in college can help you discover what you like and dislike. It also allows the individual an opportunity to exploreShow MoreRelatedEnemy Of Title Ix : The Department Of Health, Education And Welfare918 Words   |  4 Pagescomplaints by women facing gender discrimination on college campuses across the nation. Many women quickly learned filing complaints with HEW was a wasted effort, many times the filers would have to wait â€Å"14 months† to open a case and by that time the problem had been resolved (PEER 71-74). After failure to find proper documentation about effectiveness of HEW’s results, two prominent organizations; Now’s Legal Defense and Education Fund and PEER began to research the validity of such claims only toRead MoreWomen in Psychology Psy 310 Essay1470 Words   |  6 Pageseducation and integration vs. segregation as it relates to psychology. Inez was born into a family with 10 other siblings where she attended â€Å"schools for colored† in Texas. Since her family was poor, it was decided early on that they could only afford to send the oldest child (a son named Leon) to college, and once graduated that he would pave the way financially to help his siblings to attend college. However, it was apparent that Inez’s desire to attend college was greater than herRead MoreFixed Vs. Growth Mindset : The Effects Of Poverty On 6th Grade Title I Students1646 Words   |  7 PagesFIXED VS. GROWTH MINDSET: THE EFFECTS OF POVERTY ON 6TH GRADE TITLE I STUDENTS An Action Research Project Presented to The Faculty of the Department of Educational Leadership Lamar University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Education in Education Administration By Ashley C. Glover May 2017 Abstract TITLE OF ACTION RESEARCH REPORT by Ashley C. Glover Rattan, Savani, Chugh, and Dweck (2015) state that scientific research shows that students’ psychology-theirRead MoreDevelopmental Psychology1194 Words   |  5 PagesElam, K. K., Harold, G. T., Neiderhiser, J. M., Reiss, D., Shaw, D. S., Natsuaki, M. N., . . . Leve, L. D. (2014). Adoptive parent hostility and children’s peer behavior problems: Examining the role of genetically informed child attributes on adoptive parent behavior. Developmental Psychology, 50(5), 1543-1552. This source goes against the belief that nature and nurture even paly that much of a significant role in the way children grow up to portray themselves. Elam and Shaw say that it’s all aboutRead MoreThe Effects of Athletics on Student Performance Essay1302 Words   |  6 Pages Across the United States of America, approximately 55% of students participate in extracurricular sports activities. (Koebler, Jason. High School Sports Participation Increases for 22nd Straight Year. US News. U.S.News World Report, 02 Sept. 2011. Web. 03 Dec. 2013.) Academic performance, popularity, and physical fitness are all directly affected by involvement in athletics. Overall, and contrary to popular belief, those students who participate in athletic activities often have higher physicalRead MoreAnalysis Of The Article A Great Statement On The Wall Street Journal Essay1058 Words   |  5 Pagesgreat statement in their wall street journal article â€Å"Surprising Finding on Two-Year Vs Four -Year Degree’s† it states a â€Å"college degree is worth the investment†. Most of the time it is not about what kind of grades you will get or what college your accepted into, it is all about perception, including financial issues, level of independence and wheatear or not a major is already determined. Meanwhile, Community college and Four-Year universities are both wonderful options, but are meant for totally differentRead MoreLanguage Style And Content Of Speech Essay1064 Words   |  5 Pagesincluded female and male college students who were observed for head nodding in classroom in response to either female or male professors or female or male classmates. The hypothesis was that women would nod more often than men (due to their increase backchannel responses) and that students would nod more to professors than to their own classmates (due to increased backchannel responses to superiors than to peers). They also hypothesized that gender of the student and s tatus of student would correlate suchRead MoreAnalysis Of Julie Betties Women Without Class1540 Words   |  7 Pagesis an observant who is really interested in â€Å"women from working-class families across racial/ethnic identities†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (Bettie, pg. 8). She started her project in a community college, where she talks to the first generation of families attending college. Bettie observes that 20 percent high school graduates transfer to community colleges to four-year schools nationally. In addition to this â€Å"another 28 percent of Waretown graduates go directly to four-years schools; 3 percent attend trade schools; and theRead MoreFinding Employment For College Graduates1178 Words   |  5 PagesThere has been a major problem with finding employment for college graduates. Many students believe in order to receive a great job after you graduate you must attend an elite school or a predominately white school. Graduating from a historical black college most of the time gets looked down on because how people view them. There is a stigma that HBCU’s are less stringent and collect fewer less post grad employment opportunities. Sometimes receiving employment is not all about what school you graduatedRead MoreImpact of Social Media on Relationships Essay1050 Words   |  5 Pagesfamily’s favorite Christmas tradition. Of course, the sender of the friend request is not at fault, because society struggles with â€Å"what is private vs. what is public†. The research done suggests that by looking to the natural views of how the social penetration theory society has evolved that two things result; (1) we have different concepts of public vs. private information and (2) there is a much more expedient process for developing relationships than is suggested by the social penetration theory

Friday, May 15, 2020

The Effects Of School Violence On South Korea - 1308 Words

The supremacy of physical appearance in South Korea directly relates to every aspect of young people’s lives. As a whole, modern day Korea is an image-conscious and competitive nation. It is so much so that getting one’s foot in the door in love and career greatly depends on how attractive one looks. In order to enhance their social competitiveness, more and more young people have decided to undergo cosmetic surgery. First, in the middle and high school stages, there are many incidents of school violence that have occurred because of someone’s appearance. Students who look ugly will be more likely targets of ridicule. A study analyzing the reasons of school violence, shows that scholastic competence, social acceptance, athletic competence, physical appearance, behavioral conduct, global self-worth are the main reasons causing a school violence. Among them, physical appearance accounted for thirty percent of school violence as the most important reason. A half of students who enrolled this survey indicate that they have ever experienced school violence with acts of bullying and sexual harassment at least once in school life (Li 65-70). And this study also represented a phenomenon that most of the students in this bully groups are beautiful. An interview with the bully group of students found that they showed an arrogant attitude when they treated ugly students. They said that the ugly students make them uncomfortable and they thought ugly people should not be treated the sameShow MoreRelatedEssay on South Korean Education System and Human Development1478 Words   |  6 Pagesthe growth and development of the country. As the education level of the population increases, the country grows as a whole toward a large economy. South Korea, for instance, had many events in history that influenced and developed the country to what it is today. In this paper, I will provide a background on the education system of South Korea and show changes that occurred across history. Numbers on human development and government expenditures will further support my argument. During theRead MoreHigh Suicide Rates And Its Effects On The Youth3323 Words   |  14 Pagesspecifically in South Korea. There are many different factors that contribute to suicide such as depression, certain cultural values, the educational system and more. It will begin with the rates of suicide found in the country versus the average suicide rate in other countries. We will further go in depth to discover how various reasons for depression and cultural values have impacted the youth. It will also describe the rigor and intensity of the educational system in present day Korea and its effects on theRead MoreTruman1435 Words   |  6 PagesChairman Mao * Communist led by Mao Zedong emerged victorious in the Chinese civil war. * Blocked from the U.N. The Korean War * Occupied by Japan during WWII, Korea had been divided in 1945. * In June 1950, the North Korean army invaded South Korea, hoping to reunify the country under communism. * Korea became the first clear test of containment. Gen. Douglas MacArthur * Launched a counter-invasion and was successful. He even pressed towards the boarder of China. MacArthurRead MoreThe 1950s and the 1960s900 Words   |  4 Pagesmany differences as well. Their similarities and differences include: the politics, the economy, the society, and the culture of both decades. In the 1950s, North Korea moved into South Korea and began a civil war between the two parallel countries. The reason for this dispute was the border lines as well as guerrilla fighting in the South, which created a greater tension on the issue. The reason why the U.S entered the Korean War was so that the Soviet Union would not gain another nation and, in turnRead MoreAlcohol Is The Biggest Killer Of Young People1566 Words   |  7 Pagespot of cultures and alcohol has played a great role and influence in this society. Each of these cultures mentioned have brought with them their cultural habits and drinking practices. But one of the most influential alcoholic imports has been t he effect on Native Americans and Native American culture since the founding of America. Before colonists came to the new world Native Americans only produced small quantities of weak beer and wine that was used mostly in ceremonies. After the new world wasRead MoreViolent Video Games And Gun Violence830 Words   |  4 PagesTitle: Violent Video Games and Gun Violence: A False Shepard Or Violent Video Games and Gun Violence: Scapegoated Thesis Statement: While they may cause aggression in some people, playing violent video games does not cause gun violence because other countries that consume more video games per capita have less gun violence, they are mentally beneficial, and the real causes are rooted elsewhere. I. Other countries consume more video games per capita than the United States and they have significantlyRead More Media Corporations Profiting from Violence Essay1425 Words   |  6 PagesMedia Corporations Profit from Violence      Ã‚   Whether it is a body found along the road, a school shooting, or planes flying into the World Trade Center, the images will be replayed over and over on Television ad nausea.. The most horrific acts may eventually be retold in books and movies. Packaging and selling the violence of the moment belongs to television - and television will keep reminding us of it.    The special custom-made armor covered his body from neck to toe. As the black-cladRead MoreHome Is Tony Morrison s Fictional Account Of A Korean War964 Words   |  4 Pagespeople he encounters. Often, Frank can’t even avoid racist violence, such as when he was pulled into a fight with a man in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Cee experiences just as many traumatic events as Frank without even leaving for war, in fact she doesn’t even leave the state of Georgia. She is abandoned by a man she thought she loved in Atlanta, a city she knows nothing of, which she believes happened because she was unable to attend school in the nearby town of Jeffrey or to meet anyone outside herRead MoreIn America, Family Violence Such As Child Abuse And Spousal1327 Words   |  6 PagesIn America, family violence such as child abuse and spousal abuse which is mostly against women has been known to be a silent crime. There has been a high percentage of cases against women and an estimated one half of all child abuse cases have been unreported (Pepler, 1989). In the late twentieth century, feminist groups began a campaign to accomplish a goal to eliminate family violence by changing people’s realization to conclude that no victim should leave a crime unsaid .in addition, twenty-eightRead MoreThe Exploration on Traumatic Experiences of North Korean Defectors2096 Words   |  9 PagesNorth Korea is one of the few countries that maintain communist system in the world. After Kim Il-Sung died in 1994, who was a dictator for nearly 50 years, the North Korean government has lost its power on the people. Since then, communist system has collapsed and economic crisis has been aggravated. Also the food crisis in 1990s caused famine across the country. For these reasons, a lot of North Korean people have tried to escape from their home country or hide themselves in China. The number of

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Sex Trafficking Within The United States - 1355 Words

Between 14,500 and 17,500 victims are trafficked into the United States annually, and often, the average age of entry is thirteen to fourteen years old (Hodge, 2008). One victim recalls that her pimp, a man who controls sex workers and keeps the earnings, would take her and two other girls from the ninth grade out of school during lunchtime, have them do calls, and bring them back. She explains, â€Å"He knew how to read each girl—this one likes to party, that one needs a job, this one wants drugs.† By doing this he could coerce the girls into doing anything he wanted or needed them to (Collins, 2011). According to the Department of Justice, 300,000 children may become victims of sex trafficking each year (Bessler Greenwood, 2014). However, under federal law, anyone under 18 years of age persuaded into commercial sex is a victim of sex trafficking, regardless of whether the trafficker uses force, fraud, or coercion (Coorlim Ford, 2015). Despite these statistics, the n umbers reported on trafficking are inaccurate. Deirdre Bialo-Padin, the Brooklyn D.A.’S Chief of Domestic Violence explains â€Å"They’re too low. It’s an underreported crime. Who is going to raise her hand and say, ‘Hi, I’m a trafficking victim!’† When people think of human trafficking they immediately think of things such as drugs and confinement (Collins, 2011). However, most traffickers use subtle approaches to make victims feel helpless and alone so they can eventually trick them into entering into the sexShow MoreRelatedChild Sex Trafficking And Human Trafficking1096 Words   |  5 PagesChild Sex Trafficking Have you ever walked into Wal-Mart and taken the time to look at the numerous pictures of missing youth that is plastered on the wall? When looking at how long they have been missing, it ranges anywhere from months to years. Looking at their age, both boys and girls, it’s hard not to wonder if they have been kidnapped and are being trafficked. Child sex trafficking also known as human trafficking is a major issue that is not only plaguing the United States, but alsoRead MoreThe Problem Of Child Sex Trafficking1199 Words   |  5 PagesChild Sex Trafficking Have you ever walked into Wal-Mart and taken the time to look at the numerous pictures of missing youth that is plastered on the wall? When looking at how long they have been missing, it ranges anywhere from months to years. Looking at their age, both boys and girls, it is hard not to wonder if these kids are being trafficked. Child sex trafficking, also known as human trafficking, is a major issue that is not only plaguing the United States, but the world. ResidingRead MoreSex Trafficking And The United States1672 Words   |  7 Pageshuman sex trafficking, they think of heinous acts that take place in other countries where adults, children, girls and boys are exploited to perform sexual acts in exchange for money or goods against their will. They think it typically occurs in places that are less developed than the United States. However, the reality of this horrific crime is that it is taking place in the United States, and it occurs more and more each and every day. Yo ung girls are not solely the victim of human sex traffickingRead MoreThe Slavery Of The United States1603 Words   |  7 Pageslabor, sex, and financial gain runs deep and parallel to the existence of civilization. While a small portion of the history of slavery reflects a more humane and less brutal treatment of those in servitude, such as the Babylonian slaves of 18th century BC who were permitted to own land; contrastingly, most slavery practices historically have been established in a foundation of violence and control, such as the slaves of ancient Greece in 7th century BC. The history of slavery in the United StatesRead MoreProstitution, The Act Of Prostitution1324 Words   |  6 Pages Prostitution, the act of â€Å"providing or receiving sexual acts, between a prostitute and a client, in exchange for money or some other form of remuneration† (Hock 557). The idea of exchanging sex for valuables has been seen since the beginning of human society; the first reported da ta about prostitution was reported around 3000 B.C.E in one of the first known civilizations, Mesopotamia (Caraboi and Fierbinteanu 362). Also, prostitution is often referred to as â€Å"the world’s oldest profession.† TodayRead MoreVictims of Trafficking Protection Act Essay1716 Words   |  7 Pagesfeature to the VTVPA is that the United States will penalize countries if they do not comply with the VTVPA (Holman, 2009). This is an imperative feature and I think that it should be implemented throughout every single piece of legislation that deals with trafficking. Countries should be held accountable if they do not comply. The only way that sex trafficking can be officially over is if every single country complies with all the legislation. The United States looks at six different factors whenRead MoreProstitution Prevention And Prevention Act1560 Words   |  7 Pageshe perpetuation of human sex trafficking and the rising numbers of trafficked victims is also link ed to Thailand’s weak government. The combination of widespread corruption among government officials and the lack of enforcement of laws concerning the Thai sex industry has lead to the prominence of human sex trafficking. The 1996 Prostitution Prevention and Prevention Act was implemented to punish pimps, procurers, brothel owners and customers, however; this law and many others designed to protectRead MoreThe Global North And Global South Essay1472 Words   |  6 Pagesis constantly under development. These two groups are: The Global North and the Global South. The separation between the two lays in the different socio-economic and political standings of the nations within them. The Global North is composed of the primary, developed leaders, such as the United States, Australia, and European Union. On the other side of the economic and political spectrum lies the Global South, which is composed primarily of Third World nations. According to The Politics of GlobalRead Mor eThe Rights Of Immigration And Citizenship Essay1564 Words   |  7 Pagesthe standing and social worth of non-citizens in America society. The visibility of sex trafficking within the labor market becomes the issue in immigrants agency. Because many of the opportunities in the market are illegal the channels to remain employed are often underrepresented in reports and cases in the exploitation of sexual labor (U.S. Department of State, 2016). Accordingly, U.S policies on sex trafficking are driven more by ideology than empirical evidence (Brent and Lerum 2016:18) UltimatelyRead MoreHuman Trafficking1302 Words   |  6 Pagesbecome victims of trafficking, spread awareness, and to have more efficient programs to help the trafficking victims recover. Section Two: Human trafficking is the fastest growing criminal industry in the world, currently second after illegal drug-trade. Human trafficking is a violation of human rights and considered to be a form of modern day slavery, the illegal trade of humans for forced labor or exploitation, fortunately it is recognized as a growing issue in the United States. Exploitation refers

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Dreyfus Affair Research Paper free essay sample

The Dreyfus Affair was a political scandal, which polarized French society on a number of levels. The conviction of Jewish Artillery officer, Alfred Dreyfus raised many questions regarding the power of the French War Office, and called to attention the corruption within the French legal system. The Affair divided France on several levels, demonstrating the differing political methods of rural and urban France, as well as inspiring debate between Secularists and the Church, as well as the Left and Right wings. The Affair spurred an â€Å"emergence of anti-Semitic nationalist politics† (Fitch 57) and drove the formulation of a French Radical Right. This new divided and factional France, the disassociation between urban and rural society demonstrated by the Affair, as well the rampant anti-Semitism ignited by the trial established that the French were all too willing to turn on one another, and demonstrated that there was no real French unity, no real â€Å"French Nationalism. † Alfred Dreyfus was born October 9th in Mulhouse, France. He later moved to Alsace Lorrain, where he spent most of his childhood under the inattentive watch of his wealthy father. His family was forced to move to Paris when Germany Annexed the Alsace Lorrain Province in 1871. In 1877 Dreyfus entered the Ecole Polytechnique Military Academy at the age of eighteen; graduating three years later in 1880, he immediately joined the military, ultimately achieving the rank of captain in 1889, and was made assistant director to the polytechnical school. He was eventually admitted to the superior war college, where he graduated 9th in his class, eventually becoming a trainee at the army headquarters (Sinclair). A short while after his admittance to the army headquarters, Alfred Dreyfus was arrested on a claim of treachery drawn from his alleged writing of Bordereau: a document found in a wastebasket within the Statistical Section of the German embassy; the section concerned with counterintelligence. The document outlined the intentions of an army officer, believed to be Alfred Dreyfus, but later proved to be major the Count Ferdinand Walsin-Esterhazy, to sell military secrets to the Germans. It was around this time that Lieutenant Colonel du Paty de Clam, who was sure of Dreyfus’ guilt, even after being told otherwise by handwriting experts, was assigned chief investigator of the case. De Clam was ordered by his superiors to quickly conclude the matter, resulting in military pressure on the handwriting experts to produce results favorable to the Minister of War: the prosecuting side. De Clam’s conquest was joined by a number other generals due to religious affiliation, and their subsequent anti-Semitic sentiments, or their paranoia of national security. On October 15th, de Clam had Dreyfus write a dictation, which, unbeknownst to Dreyfus, was to be used as evidence against him. Satisfied with what he believed to be incriminating evidence, de Clam arrested Dreyfus on the spot, subtly offering him the alternative of suicide (Alfred Dreyfus Biography). Dreyfus was handed a guilty verdict after a corrupt trial of unreliable witnesses on the side of the prosecution. The defense was offered no testimony, no cross-examination, and faced a jury of minor officers trained to believe that the word of the Minister of War was absolute. The trial primarily consisted of slandering Dreyfus, painting him as the â€Å"dirty Jew† stereotype of the time (Mattar 144). The â€Å"Dirty Jew† stereotype evolved from anti-Semitic sentiments developed during the Middle Ages, where the newfound power of Christianity forced Jews to decide between conversion or death. The stereotype reached a high-point during the crusades, where the Jews were attacked, their synagogues burned, and the general populace was forced to flee. From their immigration into other nations developed the idea that they were scavengers, migrants, similar to rats. The Jews were looked down upon as unclean, as they were not Christian, and therefore not good, not â€Å"clean. † Dreyfus was sentenced to life in prison on the Devil’s Island penal colony in the Caribbean, coming as a surprise to both Dreyfus and his lawyer, as they believed he would be acquitted due to lack of evidence. Within the small circle interested in the trial, aristocrats and the urban populace, it was believed this punishment was far too harsh: â€Å"Had a traitor opened the border to the enemy and driven the German emperor straight to Notre-Dame† (Zola). On July 1st, 1895, Major Picquart became the head of the French Statistical Section. Picquart’s interest in the case lead to his discovery of forged case documents, planted by the former Statistical Section’s head. He presented this evidence to the Minister of War, but was ignored, concluding no matter the evidence presented proving Dreyfus’ innocence, no effort would be made to revise his case and no offer would be made for a retrial. The War Office wished to avoid a retrial, believing that acknowledging the innocence of Dreyfus would cause their own collapse under public contempt. Seeing the Major as a threat to this, Picquart was sent on a number of assignments, more often than not dangerous, in order to silence his pleas to retrial the innocent Dreyfus (Sinclair). It was around this time that a telegram sent by a foreign power was intercepted by the Lieutenant Colonel, proving Esterhazy’s guilt and, subsequently, Dreyfus’ innocence. Many came to the defense of Esterhazy, but it was clear that de Clam was at the heart of it, â€Å"with his trademark fruits of his fertile imagination† (Zola). Given a retrial after the surfacing of the new evidence, Dreyfus was again found guilty, his sentenced reduced to 10 years due to â€Å"extenuating circumstances. † This unjust punishment was met with the apathy of the people, primarily due to disassociation with political France or anti-Semitic beliefs. The War Office ultimately decided on the court-martialing of Esterhazy in order to establish his innocence and simultaneously confirm Dreyfus’. Esterhazy was unanimously acquitted after only two days, and the cause of the Dreyfusards was delivered a severe blow. A change of government in June 1898 appointed Godefroy Cavaignac, a staunch anti-revisionist, as the Minister of War. Cavaignac demanded a thorough investigation of the secret Dreyfus file, finding three documents supposedly indicative of both Dreyfus and Esterhazy’s guilt. Unfortunately for Cavaignac, one of the documents was found to be a forgery, and on August 30th, colonel Henry, the perpetrator of the forgery, was arrested. August 31st, Henry committed suicide, Esterhazy fled to Belgium, and a number of Generals involved in the cover-up resigned. Revision of the trial was inevitable, but in the months leading up to the trial, the army continued to resist, clinging to the belief that the truth would only cause internal collapse. Dreyfus is pardoned on September 19th, but is not restored his full position and his former honor until 1906. The Dreyfus trial had a number of resounding effects in the following years of the French political world. The Affair exposed corruption within both the military and the Church, calling attention to the flaws in the military hierarchy when dealing with internal Affairs. The jury, composed of minor military officers, had been taught obedience to the Ministry of War throughout their careers, eliminating the fairness and unbiased they were supposed to carry into a trial. The Affair also demonstrated the Church’s corrupt influence in the political world, as it was apparent Dreyfus’ religion played a large role on his persecution and conviction. This lead to the prompt passing of a secularist bill in 1905, separating Church and state. The Affair ultimately lead to a divided France- split due to religion, political affiliation, and wealth (Fitch 59). Throughout the trial, there existed the idea of anti-Semitism, ignited by the Affair itself. Despite his clear innocence, it was still maintained that Dreyfus was inherently guilty, dictated by the â€Å"Dirty Jew† stereotype of the time. Dreyfus was nothing more than a scapegoat, a cumulative expression of the anti-Semitic sentiments rampant at the time: â€Å"He [Dreyfus] is the victim of the lurid imagination of major du Paty de Clam, the religious circles surrounding him [the Church], and the ‘dirty Jew’ obsession† (Zola). This obvious societal division demonstrated the clear lack of unity among the French people. Despite identifying as French on a large scale, they first identified themselves as followers of the Church, as Christians, as anti-Semites. The French were so willing to turn on a clearly innocent man and the other half of the populace who supported him, because of religious stereotypes. This demonstrated that there was no real factor unifying the entirety of France, not nearly as much as there were factional loyalties, which made up a divided nation. During the Affair and in the period following it, France existed as a country, but not a nation. France existed as a place on the map, but there was no true â€Å"French† populace. The loyalties of the peoples were instead to their respective factions, created during the Affair. There were the Dreyfusards and the anti-Dreyfusards during the Affair, and immediately following it were the Left and Right wings, as well as the Church and the secularists. The Dreyfusards consisted of prominent liberals, Republicans, Socialists, anti-clerics, and aristocrats. On the opposing side: the anti-Dreyfusards were Royalists, anti-Semites, militarists, and those affiliated with the Church. The Affair was an amazing feat of unity as opposing groups were able to come together over similar opinions: the alliance between the Republicans and Socialists. Although the trial did promote unity, it was promoted on a factional level and small-scale. The Dreyfusards identified as Dreyfusards before they identified as French; on the opposing side, the anti-Dreyfusards too identified first as anti-Dreyfusards, and second as French. This factional dedication exhibited by those interested and involved in the trial demonstrated that there was no single factor unifying the general populace, instead there were unifying factors drawing small groups of people together, creating a plethora of factions which constituted France, and demonstrated that there was no French nationalism. There was instead factional nationalism: Dreyfusard nationalism or Secularist nationalism, but no French nationalism, no French nation. Despite its importance, a large majority of France, especially those who lived in rural areas, remained apathetic toward the trial. The disinterest was not a matter of intelligence, but a matter of relevance: â€Å"significant numbers of peasants remained indifferent to the Affair, not because they were unable to understand its complexities, but because it failed to strike a relevant chord in villages† (Fitch 56). This general disinterest in the countryside lead to the development of a differing political method than in urban France, where politics were based on leagues, mass movements, and mass culture. New rural politics were less driven by the â€Å"anonymous crowd† political method, which had preceded it, as less people in the countryside cared or were politically involved. The method became based on isolated political demonstrations, arguably granting greater power to the individual. The general rural populace remained uninterested in the larger ideas revealed during the Affair, viewing it only as a source of epithets and jokes to use in everyday life, contrasting greatly to the urban response to the trial where the majority of the populace was involved (Fitch 52). This disassociation between urban France and the majority of the population, who lived in rural France as peasants, goes to show the lack of a unifying factor for the majority of the people. This once again demonstrates a lack of â€Å"French† nationalism through a lack of French unity, further exemplified by the Affair. Many French historians believe that the Dreyfus Affair signified the birth French nationalism, but that was not the case. The Affair demonstrated that France was too factional, the classes too disassociated with one another for there to be any real unity across the country. The Affair teaches that on smaller scales, nationalism causes conflict. It is the overzealous pride in ones own belief, which can cause rational conflicts to spiral out of control. The Affair proposes that small-scale nationalism is the first step toward internal conflict and that nation-wide common unity is the sole cure to domestic strife.

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

The Red Room written by H.G.Wells and The Whole Towns Sleeping by Ray Bradbury Essay Example For Students

The Red Room written by H.G.Wells and The Whole Towns Sleeping by Ray Bradbury Essay The Red Room written by H. G. Wells and The Whole Towns Sleeping by Ray Bradbury are two stories that try to build up fear in their readers. Each story attempts to create and exploit the sense of fear in various ways to sustain the readers interest. The Red Room was written in 1896. Wells uses the characters, setting, beliefs and the use of archaic language to demonstrate this. In the time that The Red Room was written there was no electricity. This meant that the large rooms and long corridors that were lit with candles and firelight created an eerie atmosphere. The flickering candlelight caused shadows to move. We will write a custom essay on The Red Room written by H.G.Wells and The Whole Towns Sleeping by Ray Bradbury specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now This movement may have been one reason why so many people believed in ghosts and spirits. The Whole Towns Sleeping was set in the 1950s. In this era there was electricity, which meant there was light both inside and outside. Bradbury uses this to his advantage, contrasting the lightness of the town and the darkness of the ravine. In quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; there is no mention of ghosts. They assume the Lonely One is a person because of the physical evidence he leaves behinds, whereas in quot;The Red Roomquot; Wells capitalizes on peoples fear of the ghost to build up tension. Also in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; their social activities and groups were very different. It was not unusual for the women to go out and socialise and live alone, whereas in the time quot;The Red Roomquot; was set, it was rare for people to live alone. In The Red Room the plot is composed of the narrator who is the main character. The reader is not told anything about the narrator or his background. I can assure you said I. Wells uses the anonymous narrator in the first person perspective so the readers can place themselves in the narrators place. This builds up the anxiety in the reader because it is as if it is happening to them. In The Whole Towns Sleeping the plot is based around Lavinia who is the main character. On her solitary porch, Lavinia Nebbs, aged thirty-seven, very straight and slim, sat with a twinkling lemonade in her white fingers, tapping to her lips, waiting. Dissimilarly to Wells, Bradbury uses the third person perspective. This means the reader does not know the characters thoughts but still it is like the reader is there with the characters watching the story unfold. Both authors use the different perspectives effectively. Continuing The Red Rooms plot, the narrator appears to be a ghost hunter of some sort. He meets the old caretakers and seems to be going to investigate a supposed haunted room, the red room. If, said I, you will show me to this haunted room of yours, I will make myself comfortable there. The elderly people warn the narrator but are vague. This night of all nights! The narrator leaves to examine the room. A vast proportion of The Red Room is the journey from the caretakers room to the red room. The tension rises on the journey as Wells describes the long echoing corridors and dancing shadows. The long, draughty, subterranean passage was chilly and dusty and my candle flared and made the shadows cower and quiver. The tension rises at various points along the way. At one point the narrator thinks he hears a noise. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦Listening to a rustling that I fancied I heardÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ This builds the sense of fear by perhaps misleading the reader into thinking the narrator is not alone. There is another high-tension point on the journey where again the narrator stops abruptly. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦And gave me the impression of someone crouching to waylay me. All the sounds and movements described create the illusion the narrator is not entirely alone. The narrator investigates the red room and the tension reaches its highest as he is suspiciously knocked out. The story concludes the next morning. In The Whole Towns Sleeping plot, Lavinia meets her friends with the original plan of visiting the cinema. Alike in The Red Room, Lavinia is warned by an elderly person. Wont catch me out on no night like this. Lavinia and her friend, Francine, disregard the warnings and continue on their journey. The warnings in both The Whole Towns Sleeping and The Red Room create a sense of fear because they notify the reader that there is something to be afraid of. On their way to meet their third companion, Lavinia and Francine come across the dead body of Eliza Ramsell. The woman lay as is she were floating there, her face moon-freckled, her eyes like white marble, her tongue clamped in her lips. The imagery used paints a picture in the readers mind of Eliza, dead. Lavinia and Francine carry on to meet Helen and then go on to the drug store. The tension mounts as various characters are introduced. Bradbury uses these characters as miscellaneous suspects. Got you! Tom Dillon is one character introduced who pretends to be the Lonely One. Fear is build because the reader is unsure of who he is to begin with. The three the go on to the cinema, where Helen makes a commotion over another suspect. After the cinema they return to the drugstore, then subsequently home. In the same way as Wells, Bradbury uses this long circular journey to make the atmosphere and setting seem tense. There were a thousand people in the windows, stiff and silent, and three people on the street, the echoes following like gun shots when they tapped their heels on the oven baked pavement. After Lavinia has walked Francine and Helen home she is left to cross the deep, deep and black, black ravine alone. The story ends when Lavinia gets home and the reader is left to deduce what has happened. The Whole Towns Sleeping is set in a little town in the middle of Illinois country, America. The description of the setting at the beginning of the story displays to the reader that it is set in America. In the downtown drugstore, fans whispered in the high ceiling air. In the rococo shade of porches, invisible people sat. Bradbury uses these descriptions to create a lazy and relaxed atmosphere and to show life is as usual. This builds up the confidence of the reader whereas Wells introduces the theme of fear from the start. The Red Room is set in Lorraine Castle. This appears to be an old Victorian building in Britain. To begin with the narrator is in a room with a fire and the old people. The reader is informed this is the housekeepers room. I half suspected the old people were trying to enhance the spiritual terrors of their house by their droning insistence. Immediately Wells has created a gloomy, lonely and heavy atmosphere to intimidate the readers. As The Whole Towns Sleeping is an almost circular route, there is plentiful description of the places the characters visit. There is a lot of contrast within the story between light and dark. The drugstore is fairly well lit, this increases the confidence of the reader once again. Alternatively the cinema is dimly lit. In the dim auditorium, as they sat in the odour of ancient brass polish, the manager appearedÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The dim lighting results in poor vision, causing Helen to panic and make a scene. There is also a lot of description of the contrasting temperature. Im cold. Oh, Ive never been so cold since winter. The coldness creates fear because the reader may associate it with death and strange goings on. The extreme cold temperature also composes a nervous and uncertain atmosphere. Lavinia felt the warm breath of the summer night shimmering off the oven-baked sidewalkÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦the heat pulsed under your dress and along your legs with a stealthy sense of invasion. The similes and metaphors Bradbury uses to portray the heat create a heavy, sultry atmosphere. Dissimilarly, Wells does not refer to temperature often. Although just as Bradbury, Wells uses the journey to his advantage, with a large amount of description. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦For the moonlight coming in by the great window on the grand staircase picked out everything in vivid black shadow or silvery illumination. This particular description makes the setting seem unearthly and eerie. The two main settings are somewhat analogous. In The Red Room, the red room is a dark place, filled with flickering dancing shadows, which the narrator tries to overcome by lighting more candles. There were two big mirrors in the room, each with a pair of sconces bearing candles, and on the mantel shelf, too, were more candles in china candle sticks. All these I lit one after the other. The confidence of the reader rises and cowers in the red room as the narrators does. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦I still found the remoter darkness of the place, and its perfect stillness, too stimu lating for the imagination. Again in The Red Room Wells describes the setting as abnormal and peculiar. In The Whole Towns Sleeping the ravine is also described as a dark and frightening place. She whispered to the ravine, to the black crickets and dark green frogs and the black stream. The tension reaches its highest in the red room and in the ravine, as this is where both main characters are driven to panicking hysterically here. The physical state of the places affects their emotional state. .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 , .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 .postImageUrl , .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 , .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211:hover , .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211:visited , .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211:active { border:0!important; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211:active , .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211 .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u9297771b57ace1db8e2c6a8dcf928211:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Expansion Of Arthur"s Battle With The Giant EssayThe structure of the two stories is similar in places but also variable. In The Whole Towns Sleeping opening there is a description of the town, heat and Lavinia. In the town the sidewalks still scorched. The laid back atmosphere raises the self-assurance of the reader. Life appears to be as usual in Illinois. Lavinia and Francine meet and conversation of the Lonely One passes between them after grandma Hanolin warns them, Wont catch me out on no night like this. Just the same, Hattie McDollis was killed a month ago. And Roberta Ferry the month before. And now Eliza Ramsell has disappearedÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The deaths mentioned build fear because they suggest the Lonely One may be around. In The Red Room opening, the plot and the theme of fear are introduced immediately with warnings, conversation and descriptions of the old people. Its your own choosing. The narrator meets each of the elderly people, the man with the withered arm, the man with the shade and the old woman. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦And the door creaked on its hingesÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The mood is promptly odd and peculiar. The hostility continues to build as the old people repeat their warnings. I said ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ its your own choosing. In both The Red Room and The Whole Towns Sleeping the main characters relate to the past. In The Red Room the narrator thinks of where his predecessor died. Here it was, thought I, that my predecessor was found, and the memory of that story gave me a sudden twinge of apprehension. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦In which the young duke had died. Or, rather, in which he had begun his dying, for he had opened the door and fallen headlong down the steps I had just ascended. The thoughts of others dying where the narrator was standing cause uneasiness in the reader. In The Whole Towns Sleeping, Lavinia associates her experience with a childhood story. Remember that old ghost story you told each other when you were children? The effects of recalling this story are unforeseen. Lavinia scares herself so much she screams and creates the illusion that there was a man under the light. Both flashbacks make the main characters fearful. The middle of the two stories are mainly the journeys made. In The Red Room the narrator travels to and enter the red room. I entered, closed the door behind me at once. The apprehension increases as he checks the room and adds candles for reassurance. All through this part of the story the reader is informed of the narrators thoughts. By this time I was in a state of considerable nervous tension This mounts the tension because the reader knows that the narrator is now petrified. In The Whole Towns Sleeping middle, various suspects are introduced. All the minor characters cause uncertainty. Tom Dillon creates fear becau se we are not shown who he is at first. Hey, Im the Lonely One. This is the same with the man in the cinema and the children. Through the middle of the story, as the three make their journey, Helen and Francine are continuously nervous. Their actions do not appear to affect Lavinia until nearer the ending. There were lots of small climaxes throughout the stories. In The Whole Towns Sleeping the first is as they find Eliza dead, the next is the children. I am the Lonely One. I kill people, and then Tom Dillon. Both these two characters impersonate the Lonely One, which builds the fear. In The Red Room, there are also a few small climaxes, building up to the main climax. For example when the narrator hears a noise. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦Listening to a rustling I fancied I heardÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ This creates fear in the reader because it gives the impression he is not alone. The two main climaxes in The Whole Towns Sleeping are Lavinia crossing the ravine, panicking and thinking someone is following her. Faster. Faster. She went down the steps. Run! and when Lavinia reaches home and thinks she is safe, but it is a false illusion. The highest point of tension in The Red Room happens in the red room, as the candles start to go out and do not relight. The narrator panics, frantically trying to relight them, ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦candle in the alcove suddenly went outÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦The flame vanished, as if the wicks had been suddenly nipped between a finger and thumbÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Again Wells is describing it as if the narrator is not alone, leaving the reader to wonder whether there is a ghost or not. The ending of The Red Room is totally different to the rest of the story. There is no tension at all, it seems to have returned to reality. It is the next morning and the narrator with the elderly people. He slowly recovers his memory and contemplates what had happened. The ending is still quite ambiguous even though the narrator gives an explanation. Was the narrator knocked out from falling down, or was he hit over the head? There is neither a ghost of earl nor a ghost of countess in that roomÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The twist in the story is that they believe it not to be a ghost, but Black Fear. This is the point at which Wells seems to let us know why he wrote the story, to show there was no ghosts in this incident ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ only fear. The ending of The Whole Towns Sleeping is also ambivalent, but much more of a cliffhanger. The reader is drawn into a false sense of security. Home. Oh, safe at home. Safe, safe and safe at homeÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦Safe, safe. Listen. Not a sound. Safe, safe, oh thank God, safe at home. Lavinia thinks she is home safely and that all is fine, this really builds the assurance of the reader. But there is also, as in The Red Room, a twist to the story. What? She aske d. What? What? Behind her, in the black living-room, someone cleared his throatÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The reader is left to assume the ending. Is it the Lonely One awaiting Lavinia, or is it a family member or friend? And also the reader is left to speculate if it was the Lonely One, who is he? There is a vast amount of descriptive language throughout both stories. Wells successfully uses his dense description of the elderly people to give them frightening features. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦A second man entered, more bent, more wrinkled, more aged even than the firstÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦and his lower lip, half averted, hung pale and pink from his decaying yellow teeth. The effect here makes the reader inhospitable in return to the old people. Their very existence was spectral; the cut of their clothing, fashions born in dead brains. This makes the elderly people seem very old fashioned. The archaic expressions and dialect inform the reader of the period in which the story is set. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦And eight and twenty years you have lived and never seen the likes of this house, I reckon. The narrative voice and dialogue are much more formal in The Red Room than in The Whole Towns Sleeping. Hattie McDollis walked off with a travelling man, I bet. But the others ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ strangled ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ four of them, their tongues sticking out their mouths, they say. This is a bit of typical conversation passing between Lavinia and Francine. It shows the characters are relaxed with each other. Bradbury also uses imagery, but more often than Wells. In the downtown drugstore, fans whispered in the high ceiling air. They called back through the soft ocean of darkness. The personification sets the atmosphere as cool making the reader more confident so the later scare seems more intense. The metaphor also emphasizes the soft darkness. Bradbury uses plenty of descriptive language about the town. The little town was deep far away from everything, kept to itself by a river and a forest and a ravine. This description sets the scene. It is relaxing and calm and makes the characters seem distant from the town. In Lavinias dialogue her braveness comes across. BoshÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Lets walk the short cut. There are about eight minor characters in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot;. Each individually adds to the fear. The first character we meet is Francine. Francine sobbed again and walked on. Francine is doubting and easily upset, she screams and cries often. This fragile character adds to the anxiety because she reminds the reader there is something to be scared of. Other characters we meet are the children. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦A voice was murmuring, I am the lonely oneÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦and Im Eliza Ramsell. The children are frightening characters to begin with because we are dubious of whom they are. They bring back memories of the dead Eliza Ramsell. Next introduced is Helen. Alike Francine she is also doubting and very negative. .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 , .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 .postImageUrl , .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 , .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03:hover , .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03:visited , .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03:active { border:0!important; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03:active , .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03 .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u26d73eb6a4f5790f6660a55baaeadd03:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Anna Karenina EssayHelen turned slowly and glanced back. Im calling the managerÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Stop the film! Lights! Helen made a big commotion in the cinema, after being over cautious. Tom Dillon is a very alarming character to the reader for several reasons. A shadow fell across their faces. A figure loomed. Again the reader is unsure of whom he is. Tom Dillon portrays himself as the Lonely One. Hey, Im the Lonely One! Bradbury uses him to again remind us the Lonely One is still out there and could be anyone. He causes the three women to panic and fuss. The druggist brings news to the three women that a man was asking after Lavinia. He is cautious wi th what he says. I heard a minute ago, I suddenly thought, whatve I done! This makes the women paranoid, which makes the reader paranoid. To me the druggist is a very probable suspect, for instance how did he know about Eliza Ramsell being dead so soon after the incident? The man in the suit, who is the theatre managers brother, is a very menacing character to Helen. The fear has built up in her mind and this is where it comes across to the reader. Officer Kennedy is also a very traumatic character to Lavinia and the reader. The man was singing Shine on Harvest Moon, and he carried a long club in his hand. Officer Kennedy is introduced when Lavinia is alone and he carried a long club that she assumed was a weapon. Yes, she thought, but I wont walk the ravine with any man. How do I know who the Lonely One is? When Lavinia realises who he is she still cannot be sure or safe. Total paranoia is established. The minor character that links between the two different stories is Grandma Hanolin. In quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; Grandma Hanolin introduces the plot, she announces to the reader that life is not as usual. Wont catch me out on no night like this, wailed Grandma Hanolin, Not with the Lonely One strangling women. Lock myself in with my gun! Grandma is comparable to the old woman, the man with the withered arm and the man with the shade because she is an elderly character and alike the old people in quot;The Red Roomquot; she warns the main character. In quot;The Red Roomquot;, Wells only introduces 3 other characters. Each of these exclusively adds to the fear. The first we meet is the man with the withered arm. He seems to be hostile and unfriendly. It is your own choosing, said the man with the withered arm, and glanced at me askance. He repeats It is your own choosing three times. This warning creates a tense unwelcoming atmosphere. Another character we meet is the old woman. The old woman sat staring hard into the fire, her pale eyes wide openÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦a many thing to see and sorrow for. The womans colourless eyes give the reader the impression she has seen a ghost. She also repeats a warning, This night of all nights! Their vague warnings make the reader dubious. The most frightening character is the man with the shade. He is introduced with the spooky noise of his stick and a shambling step on the flags. Wells uses a dense description to describe him, giving him abnormal looks. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦More bent, more wrinkled, more aged even than the first. He supported himself by a single crutch, his eyes were covered by a shade, and his lower lip, half averted, hung pale and pink from his decaying yellow teeth. The mans queer looks help the reader to realise how peculiar the whole scene is. The three characters words, actions and looks affect the reader. The three of them made me feel uncomfortable, and with their gaunt silences, their bent carriage, their evident unfriendliness to me and to one another. This also makes the reader feel uncomfortable, as if the old people are almost rejecting them. The elderly people also seem to be curious as to why exactly he is there. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦And threw his head back for a moment and sideways, to see me. The next morning the people behave totally different to the narrator, creating a friendlier more relaxed atmosphere. He spoke no longer as one who greets an intruder, but as one who grieves for a broken friend. The old people seem concerned, agreeable and willing to listen, but also still a bit reserved. They clarify their own ideas and show acceptance on the narrators idea that it is fear. The two main characters, Lavinia and the narrator, tend to be very similar throughout the story. Their confidence rises and mounts at various points, causing the readers firmness to do the same. Lavinia Nebbs, aged thirty-sevenÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The reader is given information on Lavinia to make them confident. Bradbury portrays Lavinia as a strong, confident character. I insist. I wont go home and brood over it. I wont think of it. Ill fill my mind with everything else but. She is very sure of herself boosting the readers self-assurance. Lavinia, as cool as mint ice cream, took the other womans arm and led her down the winding pathÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Lavinia appears a very laid back but sometimes seems to show-off. I can see a thing and tell myself I never saw it, thats how strong I am. In quot;The Red Roomquot; the narrator also appears a very confident character. I can assure you, said I, that it will take a very tangible ghost to frighten me. The reader is not given any background information on the narrator, except he is twenty-eight years of age. This allows the readers to position themselves in the narrators place. We are not even told if the narrator is a male or a female, but looking at the historical and social background of the time the story was set I assume it is a man. In quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; and in quot;The Red Roomquot;, both Lavinia and the narrator ignore the elderly peoples warnings. The two characters confidence inclines and declines throughout the story. Their courage is high to begin with then rapidly decreases at the end. In quot;The Red Roomquot; the narrator enters the red room clear minded. I resolved to make a systematic examination of the place at onceÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Similarly in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot;, Lavinia enters the ravine optimistically. Three minutes from now, she thought, Ill be putting my key in my house door. Nothing can happen in just one hundred and eighty seconds. This again builds the confidence of the reader, but as soon as the reader sees the character begin to panic, they will do the same. Lavinia becomes hysterical. She heard music. In a mad way, a silly way, she heard the huge surge of music that pounded at her, and she realized as she ran ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ as she ran in panic and terrorÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ In the same way, the narrator in quot;The Red Roomquot; finds the whole scenario overwhelming. I flung out my arms in a vain effort to thrust that ponderous blackness away from me, and, lifting up my voice, screamed with all my mightÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The main characters panicking so madly creates a huge rush of fear for the reader. Throughout the two stories, the characters both treat their situations as adventures and are determined to overcome any fears they may have. The Lonely One in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; is the main cause for so much fear. The Lonely One is an anonymous character, no one has seen him knows anything about him. The Lonely One not being visible creates tension. The characters in the story know the Lonely One is not a ghost and exists because of the physical manifestation he leaves behind. In quot;The Red Roomquot; the supposed ghost, eventually believed to be black fear is the main cause for the theme of fear. It is unknown whether the ghost exists, and alike in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; tension is composed by it not being visible. I think the authors H. G. Wells and Ray Bradbury both successfully created a sense of fear in their readers. Although the stories were very different, they set out to compose this fear in the same ways. For example both authors used minor characters to warn the main characters, they both had a similar structure and both used plenty of descriptive language. The Red Room written by H.G.Wells and The Whole Towns Sleeping by Ray Bradbury Essay Example For Students The Red Room written by H.G.Wells and The Whole Towns Sleeping by Ray Bradbury Essay The Red Room written by H. G. Wells and The Whole Towns Sleeping by Ray Bradbury are two stories that try to build up fear in their readers. Each story attempts to create and exploit the sense of fear in various ways to sustain the readers interest. The Red Room was written in 1896. Wells uses the characters, setting, beliefs and the use of archaic language to demonstrate this. In the time that The Red Room was written there was no electricity. This meant that the large rooms and long corridors that were lit with candles and firelight created an eerie atmosphere. The flickering candlelight caused shadows to move. We will write a custom essay on The Red Room written by H.G.Wells and The Whole Towns Sleeping by Ray Bradbury specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now This movement may have been one reason why so many people believed in ghosts and spirits. The Whole Towns Sleeping was set in the 1950s. In this era there was electricity, which meant there was light both inside and outside. Bradbury uses this to his advantage, contrasting the lightness of the town and the darkness of the ravine. In quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; there is no mention of ghosts. They assume the Lonely One is a person because of the physical evidence he leaves behinds, whereas in quot;The Red Roomquot; Wells capitalizes on peoples fear of the ghost to build up tension. Also in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; their social activities and groups were very different. It was not unusual for the women to go out and socialise and live alone, whereas in the time quot;The Red Roomquot; was set, it was rare for people to live alone. In The Red Room the plot is composed of the narrator who is the main character. The reader is not told anything about the narrator or his background. I can assure you said I. Wells uses the anonymous narrator in the first person perspective so the readers can place themselves in the narrators place. This builds up the anxiety in the reader because it is as if it is happening to them. In The Whole Towns Sleeping the plot is based around Lavinia who is the main character. On her solitary porch, Lavinia Nebbs, aged thirty-seven, very straight and slim, sat with a twinkling lemonade in her white fingers, tapping to her lips, waiting. Dissimilarly to Wells, Bradbury uses the third person perspective. This means the reader does not know the characters thoughts but still it is like the reader is there with the characters watching the story unfold. Both authors use the different perspectives effectively. Continuing The Red Rooms plot, the narrator appears to be a ghost hunter of some sort. He meets the old caretakers and seems to be going to investigate a supposed haunted room, the red room. If, said I, you will show me to this haunted room of yours, I will make myself comfortable there. The elderly people warn the narrator but are vague. This night of all nights! The narrator leaves to examine the room. A vast proportion of The Red Room is the journey from the caretakers room to the red room. The tension rises on the journey as Wells describes the long echoing corridors and dancing shadows. The long, draughty, subterranean passage was chilly and dusty and my candle flared and made the shadows cower and quiver. The tension rises at various points along the way. At one point the narrator thinks he hears a noise. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦Listening to a rustling that I fancied I heardÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ This builds the sense of fear by perhaps misleading the reader into thinking the narrator is not alone. There is another high-tension point on the journey where again the narrator stops abruptly. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦And gave me the impression of someone crouching to waylay me. All the sounds and movements described create the illusion the narrator is not entirely alone. The narrator investigates the red room and the tension reaches its highest as he is suspiciously knocked out. The story concludes the next morning. In The Whole Towns Sleeping plot, Lavinia meets her friends with the original plan of visiting the cinema. Alike in The Red Room, Lavinia is warned by an elderly person. Wont catch me out on no night like this. Lavinia and her friend, Francine, disregard the warnings and continue on their journey. The warnings in both The Whole Towns Sleeping and The Red Room create a sense of fear because they notify the reader that there is something to be afraid of. On their way to meet their third companion, Lavinia and Francine come across the dead body of Eliza Ramsell. The woman lay as is she were floating there, her face moon-freckled, her eyes like white marble, her tongue clamped in her lips. The imagery used paints a picture in the readers mind of Eliza, dead. Lavinia and Francine carry on to meet Helen and then go on to the drug store. The tension mounts as various characters are introduced. Bradbury uses these characters as miscellaneous suspects. Got you! Tom Dillon is one character introduced who pretends to be the Lonely One. Fear is build because the reader is unsure of who he is to begin with. The three the go on to the cinema, where Helen makes a commotion over another suspect. After the cinema they return to the drugstore, then subsequently home. In the same way as Wells, Bradbury uses this long circular journey to make the atmosphere and setting seem tense. There were a thousand people in the windows, stiff and silent, and three people on the street, the echoes following like gun shots when they tapped their heels on the oven baked pavement. After Lavinia has walked Francine and Helen home she is left to cross the deep, deep and black, black ravine alone. The story ends when Lavinia gets home and the reader is left to deduce what has happened. The Whole Towns Sleeping is set in a little town in the middle of Illinois country, America. The description of the setting at the beginning of the story displays to the reader that it is set in America. In the downtown drugstore, fans whispered in the high ceiling air. In the rococo shade of porches, invisible people sat. Bradbury uses these descriptions to create a lazy and relaxed atmosphere and to show life is as usual. This builds up the confidence of the reader whereas Wells introduces the theme of fear from the start. The Red Room is set in Lorraine Castle. This appears to be an old Victorian building in Britain. To begin with the narrator is in a room with a fire and the old people. The reader is informed this is the housekeepers room. I half suspected the old people were trying to enhance the spiritual terrors of their house by their droning insistence. Immediately Wells has created a gloomy, lonely and heavy atmosphere to intimidate the readers. As The Whole Towns Sleeping is an almost circular route, there is plentiful description of the places the characters visit. There is a lot of contrast within the story between light and dark. The drugstore is fairly well lit, this increases the confidence of the reader once again. Alternatively the cinema is dimly lit. In the dim auditorium, as they sat in the odour of ancient brass polish, the manager appearedÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The dim lighting results in poor vision, causing Helen to panic and make a scene. There is also a lot of description of the contrasting temperature. Im cold. Oh, Ive never been so cold since winter. The coldness creates fear because the reader may associate it with death and strange goings on. The extreme cold temperature also composes a nervous and uncertain atmosphere. Lavinia felt the warm breath of the summer night shimmering off the oven-baked sidewalkÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦the heat pulsed under your dress and along your legs with a stealthy sense of invasion. The similes and metaphors Bradbury uses to portray the heat create a heavy, sultry atmosphere. Dissimilarly, Wells does not refer to temperature often. Although just as Bradbury, Wells uses the journey to his advantage, with a large amount of description. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦For the moonlight coming in by the great window on the grand staircase picked out everything in vivid black shadow or silvery illumination. This particular description makes the setting seem unearthly and eerie. The two main settings are somewhat analogous. In The Red Room, the red room is a dark place, filled with flickering dancing shadows, which the narrator tries to overcome by lighting more candles. There were two big mirrors in the room, each with a pair of sconces bearing candles, and on the mantel shelf, too, were more candles in china candle sticks. All these I lit one after the other. The confidence of the reader rises and cowers in the red room as the narrators does. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦I still found the remoter darkness of the place, and its perfect stillness, too stimu lating for the imagination. Again in The Red Room Wells describes the setting as abnormal and peculiar. In The Whole Towns Sleeping the ravine is also described as a dark and frightening place. She whispered to the ravine, to the black crickets and dark green frogs and the black stream. The tension reaches its highest in the red room and in the ravine, as this is where both main characters are driven to panicking hysterically here. The physical state of the places affects their emotional state. .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf , .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf .postImageUrl , .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf , .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf:hover , .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf:visited , .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf:active { border:0!important; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf:active , .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u4b1732dbccdef7668e092d77c5e7e7bf:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Technology vs Humanity EssayThe structure of the two stories is similar in places but also variable. In The Whole Towns Sleeping opening there is a description of the town, heat and Lavinia. In the town the sidewalks still scorched. The laid back atmosphere raises the self-assurance of the reader. Life appears to be as usual in Illinois. Lavinia and Francine meet and conversation of the Lonely One passes between them after grandma Hanolin warns them, Wont catch me out on no night like this. Just the same, Hattie McDollis was killed a month ago. And Roberta Ferry the month before. And now Eliza Ramsell has disappearedÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The deaths mentioned build fear because they suggest the Lonely One may be around. In The Red Room opening, the plot and the theme of fear are introduced immediately with warnings, conversation and descriptions of the old people. Its your own choosing. The narrator meets each of the elderly people, the man with the withered arm, the man with the shade and the old woman. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦And the door creaked on its hingesÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The mood is promptly odd and peculiar. The hostility continues to build as the old people repeat their warnings. I said ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ its your own choosing. In both The Red Room and The Whole Towns Sleeping the main characters relate to the past. In The Red Room the narrator thinks of where his predecessor died. Here it was, thought I, that my predecessor was found, and the memory of that story gave me a sudden twinge of apprehension. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦In which the young duke had died. Or, rather, in which he had begun his dying, for he had opened the door and fallen headlong down the steps I had just ascended. The thoughts of others dying where the narrator was standing cause uneasiness in the reader. In The Whole Towns Sleeping, Lavinia associates her experience with a childhood story. Remember that old ghost story you told each other when you were children? The effects of recalling this story are unforeseen. Lavinia scares herself so much she screams and creates the illusion that there was a man under the light. Both flashbacks make the main characters fearful. The middle of the two stories are mainly the journeys made. In The Red Room the narrator travels to and enter the red room. I entered, closed the door behind me at once. The apprehension increases as he checks the room and adds candles for reassurance. All through this part of the story the reader is informed of the narrators thoughts. By this time I was in a state of considerable nervous tension This mounts the tension because the reader knows that the narrator is now petrified. In The Whole Towns Sleeping middle, various suspects are introduced. All the minor characters cause uncertainty. Tom Dillon creates fear becau se we are not shown who he is at first. Hey, Im the Lonely One. This is the same with the man in the cinema and the children. Through the middle of the story, as the three make their journey, Helen and Francine are continuously nervous. Their actions do not appear to affect Lavinia until nearer the ending. There were lots of small climaxes throughout the stories. In The Whole Towns Sleeping the first is as they find Eliza dead, the next is the children. I am the Lonely One. I kill people, and then Tom Dillon. Both these two characters impersonate the Lonely One, which builds the fear. In The Red Room, there are also a few small climaxes, building up to the main climax. For example when the narrator hears a noise. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦Listening to a rustling I fancied I heardÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ This creates fear in the reader because it gives the impression he is not alone. The two main climaxes in The Whole Towns Sleeping are Lavinia crossing the ravine, panicking and thinking someone is following her. Faster. Faster. She went down the steps. Run! and when Lavinia reaches home and thinks she is safe, but it is a false illusion. The highest point of tension in The Red Room happens in the red room, as the candles start to go out and do not relight. The narrator panics, frantically trying to relight them, ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦candle in the alcove suddenly went outÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦The flame vanished, as if the wicks had been suddenly nipped between a finger and thumbÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Again Wells is describing it as if the narrator is not alone, leaving the reader to wonder whether there is a ghost or not. The ending of The Red Room is totally different to the rest of the story. There is no tension at all, it seems to have returned to reality. It is the next morning and the narrator with the elderly people. He slowly recovers his memory and contemplates what had happened. The ending is still quite ambiguous even though the narrator gives an explanation. Was the narrator knocked out from falling down, or was he hit over the head? There is neither a ghost of earl nor a ghost of countess in that roomÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The twist in the story is that they believe it not to be a ghost, but Black Fear. This is the point at which Wells seems to let us know why he wrote the story, to show there was no ghosts in this incident ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ only fear. The ending of The Whole Towns Sleeping is also ambivalent, but much more of a cliffhanger. The reader is drawn into a false sense of security. Home. Oh, safe at home. Safe, safe and safe at homeÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦Safe, safe. Listen. Not a sound. Safe, safe, oh thank God, safe at home. Lavinia thinks she is home safely and that all is fine, this really builds the assurance of the reader. But there is also, as in The Red Room, a twist to the story. What? She aske d. What? What? Behind her, in the black living-room, someone cleared his throatÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The reader is left to assume the ending. Is it the Lonely One awaiting Lavinia, or is it a family member or friend? And also the reader is left to speculate if it was the Lonely One, who is he? There is a vast amount of descriptive language throughout both stories. Wells successfully uses his dense description of the elderly people to give them frightening features. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦A second man entered, more bent, more wrinkled, more aged even than the firstÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦and his lower lip, half averted, hung pale and pink from his decaying yellow teeth. The effect here makes the reader inhospitable in return to the old people. Their very existence was spectral; the cut of their clothing, fashions born in dead brains. This makes the elderly people seem very old fashioned. The archaic expressions and dialect inform the reader of the period in which the story is set. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦And eight and twenty years you have lived and never seen the likes of this house, I reckon. The narrative voice and dialogue are much more formal in The Red Room than in The Whole Towns Sleeping. Hattie McDollis walked off with a travelling man, I bet. But the others ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ strangled ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ four of them, their tongues sticking out their mouths, they say. This is a bit of typical conversation passing between Lavinia and Francine. It shows the characters are relaxed with each other. Bradbury also uses imagery, but more often than Wells. In the downtown drugstore, fans whispered in the high ceiling air. They called back through the soft ocean of darkness. The personification sets the atmosphere as cool making the reader more confident so the later scare seems more intense. The metaphor also emphasizes the soft darkness. Bradbury uses plenty of descriptive language about the town. The little town was deep far away from everything, kept to itself by a river and a forest and a ravine. This description sets the scene. It is relaxing and calm and makes the characters seem distant from the town. In Lavinias dialogue her braveness comes across. BoshÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Lets walk the short cut. There are about eight minor characters in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot;. Each individually adds to the fear. The first character we meet is Francine. Francine sobbed again and walked on. Francine is doubting and easily upset, she screams and cries often. This fragile character adds to the anxiety because she reminds the reader there is something to be scared of. Other characters we meet are the children. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦A voice was murmuring, I am the lonely oneÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦and Im Eliza Ramsell. The children are frightening characters to begin with because we are dubious of whom they are. They bring back memories of the dead Eliza Ramsell. Next introduced is Helen. Alike Francine she is also doubting and very negative. .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 , .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 .postImageUrl , .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 , .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3:hover , .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3:visited , .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3:active { border:0!important; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3:active , .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3 .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u3a66ba8161ac281d39090ebfc5aae0c3:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Charlotte O'Neil's Song be described as a protest song EssayHelen turned slowly and glanced back. Im calling the managerÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Stop the film! Lights! Helen made a big commotion in the cinema, after being over cautious. Tom Dillon is a very alarming character to the reader for several reasons. A shadow fell across their faces. A figure loomed. Again the reader is unsure of whom he is. Tom Dillon portrays himself as the Lonely One. Hey, Im the Lonely One! Bradbury uses him to again remind us the Lonely One is still out there and could be anyone. He causes the three women to panic and fuss. The druggist brings news to the three women that a man wa s asking after Lavinia. He is cautious with what he says. I heard a minute ago, I suddenly thought, whatve I done! This makes the women paranoid, which makes the reader paranoid. To me the druggist is a very probable suspect, for instance how did he know about Eliza Ramsell being dead so soon after the incident? The man in the suit, who is the theatre managers brother, is a very menacing character to Helen. The fear has built up in her mind and this is where it comes across to the reader. Officer Kennedy is also a very traumatic character to Lavinia and the reader. The man was singing Shine on Harvest Moon, and he carried a long club in his hand. Officer Kennedy is introduced when Lavinia is alone and he carried a long club that she assumed was a weapon. Yes, she thought, but I wont walk the ravine with any man. How do I know who the Lonely One is? When Lavinia realises who he is she still cannot be sure or safe. Total paranoia is established. The minor character that links between the two different stories is Grandma Hanolin. In quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; Grandma Hanolin introduces the plot, she announces to the reader that life is not as usual. Wont catch me out on no night like this, wailed Grandma Hanolin, Not with the Lonely One strangling women. Lock myself in with my gun! Grandma is comparable to the old woman, the man with the withered arm and the man with the shade because she is an elderly character and alike the old people in quot;The Red Roomquot; she warns the main character. In quot;The Red Roomquot;, Wells only introduces 3 other characters. Each of these exclusively adds to the fear. The first we meet is the man with the withered arm. He seems to be hostile and unfriendly. It is your own choosing, said the man with the withered arm, and glanced at me askance. He repeats It is your own choosing three times. This warning creates a tense unwelcoming atmosphere. Another character we meet is the old woman. The old woman sat staring hard into the fire, her pale eyes wide openÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦a many thing to see and sorrow for. The womans colourless eyes give the reader the impression she has seen a ghost. She also repeats a warning, This night of all nights! Their vague warnings make the reader dubious. The most frightening character is the man with the shade. He is introduced with the spooky noise of his stick and a shambling step on the flags. Wells uses a dense description to describe him, giving him abnormal looks. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦More bent, more wrinkled, more aged even than the first. He supported himself by a single crutch, his eyes were covered by a shade, and his lower lip, half averted, hung pale and pink from his decaying yellow teeth. The mans queer looks help the reader to realise how peculiar the whole scene is. The three characters words, actions and looks affect the reader. The three of them made me feel uncomfortable, and with their gaunt silences, their bent carriage, their evident unfriendliness to me and to one another. This also makes the reader feel uncomfortable, as if the old people are almost rejecting them. The elderly people also seem to be curious as to why exactly he is there. ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦And threw his head back for a moment and sideways, to see me. The next morning the people behave totally different to the narrator, creating a friendlier more relaxed atmosphere. He spoke no longer as one who greets an intruder, but as one who grieves for a broken friend. The old people seem concerned, agreeable and willing to listen, but also still a bit reserved. They clarify their own ideas and show acceptance on the narrators idea that it is fear. The two main characters, Lavinia and the narrator, tend to be very similar throughout the story. Their confidence rises and mounts at various points, causing the readers firmness to do the same. Lavinia Nebbs, aged thirty-sevenÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The reader is given information on Lavinia to make them confident. Bradbury portrays Lavinia as a strong, confident character. I insist. I wont go home and brood over it. I wont think of it. Ill fill my mind with everything else but. She is very sure of herself boosting the readers self-assurance. Lavinia, as cool as mint ice cream, took the other womans arm and led her down the winding pathÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Lavinia appears a very laid back but sometimes seems to show-off. I can see a thing and tell myself I never saw it, thats how strong I am. In quot;The Red Roomquot; the narrator also appears a very confident character. I can assure you, said I, that it will take a very tangible ghost to frighten me. The reader is not given any background information on the narrator, except he is twenty-eight years of age. This allows the readers to position themselves in the narrators place. We are not even told if the narrator is a male or a female, but looking at the historical and social background of the time the story was set I assume it is a man. In quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; and in quot;The Red Roomquot;, both Lavinia and the narrator ignore the elderly peoples warnings. The two characters confidence inclines and declines throughout the story. Their courage is high to begin with then rapidly decreases at the end. In quot;The Red Roomquot; the narrator enters the red room clear minded. I resolved to make a systematic examination of the place at onceÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ Similarly in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot;, Lavinia enters the ravine optimistically. Three minutes from now, she thought, Ill be putting my key in my house door. Nothing can happen in just one hundred and eighty seconds. This again builds the confidence of the reader, but as soon as the reader sees the character begin to panic, they will do the same. Lavinia becomes hysterical. She heard music. In a mad way, a silly way, she heard the huge surge of music that pounded at her, and she realized as she ran ÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“ as she ran in panic and terrorÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ In the same way, the narrator in quot;The Red Roomquot; finds the whole scenario overwhelming. I flung out my arms in a vain effort to thrust that ponderous blackness away from me, and, lifting up my voice, screamed with all my mightÃÆ' ¢Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ ¬Ãƒâ€šÃ‚ ¦ The main characters panicking so madly creates a huge rush of fear for the reader. Throughout the two stories, the characters both treat their situations as adventures and are determined to overcome any fears they may have. The Lonely One in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; is the main cause for so much fear. The Lonely One is an anonymous character, no one has seen him knows anything about him. The Lonely One not being visible creates tension. The characters in the story know the Lonely One is not a ghost and exists because of the physical manifestation he leaves behind. In quot;The Red Roomquot; the supposed ghost, eventually believed to be black fear is the main cause for the theme of fear. It is unknown whether the ghost exists, and alike in quot;The Whole Townquot;s Sleepingquot; tension is composed by it not being visible. I think the authors H. G. Wells and Ray Bradbury both successfully created a sense of fear in their readers. Although the stories were very different, they set out to compose this fear in the same ways. For example both authors used minor characters to warn the main characters, they both had a similar structure and both used plenty of descriptive language.

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Wordiness and Redundancy in ACT English Tips and Practice

Wordiness and Redundancy in ACT English Tips and Practice SAT / ACT Prep Online Guides and Tips ACT English tests you on a number of specific grammar rules. Being able to understand and apply these rules will help you maximize your ACT English score. Besides knowing specific grammar rules, there are some general strategies to keep in mind that will help you correctly answer more questions. One of these tips is that the ACT prefers shorter sentences. Wordiness and redundancy are common errors on the ACT English section. The goal for each sentence is to express the same information in the shortest grammatically correct way. In this post, I'll do the following: Explain wordiness. Explain redundancy. Show how wordiness and redundancy are tested on the ACT. Provide actual ACT examples. Give practice problems to test you on what you've learned. Wordiness on ACT English On the ACT, wordiness is a grammatical error in which extra words or phrases are added to a sentence unnecessarily. Concise writing is preferable because conciseness makes a sentence more understandable and easier to follow. Wordy sentences can be difficult to navigate and tough to comprehend. On the ACT English section, the shortest grammatically correct answer choice that expresses the same information as the original sentence will be the right answer. Here's an example of a wordy sentence: Allison took me to a party that was a very fun time. This is the corrected version of the sentence: Allison took me to a very fun party. Technically, both sentences are grammatically correct and convey the same information. However, the second sentence is more concise and less wordy. Check out another example of a wordy sentence: I enjoy getting my nourishment by way of fried foods. After we fix the wordiness error, this is what the sentence looks like: I enjoy eating fried foods. Again, the meaning of the sentences is the same, but the second sentence is much more concise and grammatically correct. Check out these tips for correctly answering wordiness questions on the ACT. WordinessStrategy Approach each question with the mindset that shorter = better. When answering ACT English questions, start by looking at the shorter answer choices. Keep in mind that the shorter grammatically correct answer choice must also express the same relevant information for it to be the right answer. Plug your answer back into the original sentence to make sure that your answer is grammatically correct and expresses the same information. Use these tips to answer the following examples taken from actual ACT English sections. Actual ACT English Examples Choose the correct answer for this wordiness question from a real ACT. He then wrote an enthusiastic article for Strand Magazine, being the place in which most of his Sherlock Holmes stories had first appeared, and later wrote a book on the subject titled The Coming of the Fairies. A. NO CHANGEB. in which the magazine where C. in which D. being where Explanation:Even if the original sentence seems correct to you, remember our rule that shorter is better. Start with the shortest answer choice. That would be answer choice C. Plug it back into the original sentence. The sentence is still grammatically correct and all of the relevant info is still there. The phrase â€Å"being the place† is unnecessary. The answer is C. Try your luck at another actual ACT wordiness question. She worked for thirty years as a teacher and librarian in the field of education in Baltimore public schools. Which of the following words or phrases from the preceding sentence is LEAST necessary and could therefore be deleted? F. thirty G. and librarian H. in the field of education J. Baltimore public Explanation: In this type of question, you have to pick which word/phrase can be deleted without getting rid of any information. Go through the answer choices and see if the information in the answer choice can be obtained elsewhere in the sentence. So answer choice F isn’t correct because if we got rid of â€Å"thirty†, we would have no way of knowing that she worked for thirty years. The answer is H. If we got rid of â€Å"in the field of education," we would still know that she worked in the field of education because she worked in Baltimore public schools. Therefore, the phrase â€Å"in the field of education† is unnecessary. Baltimore downtown Are you figuring out how to solve these wordiness questions? Here's a final one for you to try. Over many weeks, as time goes by, her collection slowly grows: clay bowls, cups, vases, and sculptures fill the studio. A. NO CHANGE B. with the passing of time, C. gradually, D. OMIT the underlined portion Explanation: Again, let’s start with the shortest answer. That would be answer choice D, omitting the underlined portion.Is the sentence still grammatically correct? Does it have the same meaning if we omit â€Å"as time goes by?" Yes!! The underlined phrase is unnecessary because â€Å"over many weeks† implies â€Å"as time goes by over many weeks†. Therefore, the underlined phrase is superfluous and the answer is D. Another error which can be corrected by implementing our shorter is better rule is redundancy. Redundancy on the ACT Redundancy questions on the ACT English section are fairly common. If a word or phrase is redundant, it is unnecessary and can be eliminated without altering the meaning of the sentence. On the ACT, redundancy tends to be presented in two ways. The first way is that two synonyms will be used to describe something when only one of the words is necessary. Here is an example: Justin is a very friendly and amicable guy. Because "friendly" and "amicable" are synonyms, we can shorten the sentence by getting rid of one of the adjectives that describes Justin. The second way that a redundancy error is presented on the SAT is that a phrase will be added that is implied by another word or phrase in the sentence. Take a look at the following example: This article contains pertinent information that offers relevant facts for doing well in ACT English. The words "pertinent" and "relevant" are synonyms. The phrase "that offers relevant facts" doesn't add any new information to the sentence; therefore, it can be eliminated. This is the corrected version of the sentence: This article contains pertinent information for doing well in ACT English. Does that make sense? The sentence is shorter, grammatically correct, and it expresses the same information. Here are some tips to help you solve redundancy questions on the ACT. RedundancyStrategy Look at the shortest answer choices first. Plug the shortest answer choice back into the original sentence. If the sentence maintains its meaning and is grammatically correct, that's the right answer. Make sure that two synonyms aren't being used to describe the same thing. Verify that the information in the underlined phrase is not implied elsewhere in the sentence. Use these tips to answer the following redundancy questions taken from real ACTs. Actual ACT English Examples Try to figure out this redundancy question from a real ACT. I think maybe I might possibly have met them all. F. NO CHANGE G. perhaps I've H. I've possibly J. I've Explanation: Well, the underlined phrase indicates that we’re probably dealing with a redundancy question. The words â€Å"might† and â€Å"possibly† are synonyms, so we don’t need both of them. Let’s look at the shortest answer choice. That's J. â€Å"I’ve† is just the contraction for â€Å"I have† so the only change to the sentence is getting rid of â€Å"might possibly." Will the meaning of the sentence change? No. The word â€Å"maybe† indicates that I â€Å"might possibly† have met them. Therefore, â€Å"might possibly† is redundant and the answer is J. Does that make sense? Try another one. Today, Smith's repertoire is so vast that she could speak consecutively for twelve hours straight without running out of material. A. NO CHANGE B. continuously nonstop C. perpetually D. OMIT the underlined portion Explanation: Based on the context of the sentence, â€Å"consecutively† means without stopping. Can that information be gathered elsewhere in the sentence? Yes. The phrase â€Å"for twelve hours straight† means that she could speak for twelve hours without stopping. Therefore, â€Å"consecutively† is unnecessary. Now, let’s look at D, the shortest answer choice. Will the sentence still be grammatically correct if we get rid of â€Å"consecutively†? Yes. The answer is D. Madonna wants you to have one more chance to correctly answer a redundancy question. And just for good measure, here's one final example of a redundancy question. He also began to calculate annual tables of yearly sets of astronomical data, which became the basis for almanacs published under his name from 1792 through 1797. A. NO CHANGE B. covering a year's worth C. about twelve months D. OMIT the underlined portion Explanation: Can the information in the underlined phrase be obtained elsewhere in the sentence? Yes. The word â€Å"annual† means yearly. If there were annual tables of astronomical data, then we already know that there were yearly sets. Therefore, the phrase is unnecessary. The shortest answer choice is D. Will the sentence be grammatically correct if we omit the underlined portion? Yes. The answer is D. These questions aren't overly complicated, but you can easily miss a redundancy question if you don't read each sentence carefully. Make sure to follow the strategies I gave you for redundancy questions. Here are some general guidelines to help you correctly answer both wordiness and redundancy questions. General ACT English Strategies for Wordiness and Redundancy #1: Shorter is Better If the shortest answer choice maintains the meaning of the original sentence and is grammatically correct, then the shortest answer choice will be the right answer. Make sure that the shortest answer choice is still grammatically correct and expresses the same information as the original sentence. #2: Plug in the Shortest Answer Choice First Because shorter is better, determine whether the shortest answer choice is appropriate for the sentence. If a more concise answer choice maintains the meaning of the original sentence and is grammatically correct, then that is the right answer. #3: Determine Whether the Underlined Word/Phrase is Necessary If the information in the underlined word or phrase can be gathered from other words or phrases in the sentence, then the underlined word or phrase is redundant and should be omitted. I've created some realistic practice problems to test your knowledge of wordiness and redundancy on the ACT. Additional ACT English Practice Questions 1. Lauren was spending so many hours at her job at the zoo that her leisure time was minimal and not abundant at all. A. NO CHANGE B. minimal and not abundant. C. at a minimum. D. minimal. 2. In the next two weeks of time in the future, Tarica will be receiving a check for the legal work she performed for her client. A. NO CHANGE B. In the next two weeks of time in the future; C. In the next two weeks, D. OMIT the underlined portion 3. The teacher became increasingly frustrated with the rowdy student who acted in a wild, disorderly manner. A. NO CHANGE B. who acted wildly. C. whom acted wildly. D. OMIT the underlined portion 4. George, after thirty years of work in the automotive industry, was thoroughly overjoyed to retire and no longer go to his job. A. NO CHANGE B. and no longer have to work. C. but no longer have to go to his job. D. OMIT the underlined portion Answers: 1. D, 2. C, 3. D, 4. D What's Next? To get a general overview of all the grammar rules covered on the ACT English section, read this article about grammar for the ACT. If you would like to learn about another frequently tested grammar issue on the ACT, check out this post about faulty modifiers. Also, as you continue preparing for the ACT, I highly recommend that you investigate the best ACT prep websites. Want to improve your ACT score by 4 points? Check out our best-in-class online ACT prep program. We guarantee your money back if you don't improve your ACT score by 4 points or more. Our program is entirely online, and it customizes what you study to your strengths and weaknesses. If you liked this English lesson, you'll love our program.Along with more detailed lessons, you'll get thousands ofpractice problems organized by individual skills so you learn most effectively. We'll also give you a step-by-step program to follow so you'll never be confused about what to study next. Check out our 5-day free trial: